Tag Archives: 6.5

VMware vSAN 6.6 Upgrade Steps

The VMware vSAN 6.6 has been released today. In this post, I am going to run through the 3 steps to upgrade vSAN 6.5 to vSAN 6.6. Upgrading Virtual SAN is a multistage process, in which you must perform the upgrade procedures in the order described here:

  1. Upgrade vCenter Server to version 6.5.0d
  2. Upgrade ESXi Hosts to version 6.5.0d
  3. Upgrade the vSAN on-disk format to version 5.0

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VMware vSAN 6.6 GA - Download Links Available

Today VMware has made the bits for vSAN 6.6 available for everyone to download.

What's New

  • Unicast - In vSAN 6.6, cluster communication has been redesigned to use unicast traffic. Multicast is no longer required on the physical switches to support the vSAN cluster.
  • Encryption - vSAN supports data-at-rest encryption of the vSAN datastore. When encryption is enabled, vSAN performs a rolling reformat of every disk group in the cluster.
  • Enhanced Stretched Clusters with Local Failure Protection - Previously, vSAN's was able to provide a fully active-active, stretched cluster. vSAN 6.6 takes this a step further, allowing for storage redundancy within a site AND across sites at the same time.
  • Site Affinity for Stretched Clusters - A new feature for vSAN 6.6 Stretched Clusters is the ability to configure site affinity.
  • Configuration Assist and Updates - New Configuration Assist and Updates pages allows to check the configuration of your vSAN cluster, and resolve any issues.
  • Resynchronization throttling - IOPS used for cluster resynchronization can be throttled to prevent performance bottlenecks.
  • vSAN Health Command Line Tool - A new esxcli command allows to check vSAN health from the command line (esxcli vsan health).
  • Degraded Device Handling - vSAN 6.6 provides a more proactively stable environment with the detection of degraded and failing devices.

Additional Information

VMware ESXi 6.5 - IO Devices not certified for upgrade

vmware-hcl-65Beside Server Hardware, also double check if your IO Devices (eg. NIC, HBA,..) are supported when updating ESXi hosts from VMware vSphere 6.0 to 6.5. The following devices were supported in vSphere 6.0 but are according to VMwares HCL not (yet) supported in vSphere 6.5.

  • Not supported does not say that it does not work.
  • The list has been created with the help of my IO-Devices HCL in JSON Format.
  • Did I miss something? Please comment.

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vCenter Service Appliance 6.5 Tips and Tricks

The following tips and tricks might come handy when working with the vCenter Service Appliance 6.5:

  • Enable SSH
  • File Transfer with SCP/SFTP (WinSCP)
  • Login with Public Key Authentication
  • Disable or Increase Shell Session Timeout
  • Reset vCenter Server Appliance 6.5 root password
  • VIMTop
  • Certificate Warning

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Script to add vSphere 6.5 VMCA Root Certificate to Trusted Certs Store

When running vSphere 6.5 deployments in default (recommended) mode, VMware Certificate Authority is its own root certificate authority. Everything fine and secure with this configuration, but your browser displays a warning because the root certificate is not trusted.
there-is-a-problem-with-this-security-certificate

I made a little script (VBS) that pulls the CA certificate from a vCenter Server or Platform Services Controller and adds it to the local trusted root certificates store. When the root CA is trusted, browser warnings are gone.

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Homelab: Downsizing vCenter Server Appliance 6.5

In vSphere 6.5 the smallest supported memory configuration for the vCenter Server Appliance has been raised from 8GB to 10GB. The smallest "Tiny" deployment size allows up to 10 ESXi Hosts and 100 Virtual Machines. Resources in Homelabs are limited and you might want to lower the memory consumption of the vCenter Servcer Appliance. This article explains how to lower the resource consumption to be able to lower the memory to about 6GB without noticable impacts.

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ESXi 6.5 Feburary 2017 Patch with NSX Support (Build 4887370)

VMware has published a patch for ESXi 6.5 and the corresponding vCenter Server version. This patch [..l}] and is the first 6.5 release to support VMware NSX.

Product: VMware ESXi 6.5
Release date: February 2, 2017
Patch: ESXi650-201701001
Build: 4887370
Links: KB2147869 | Download Read more »

How to add AD Authentication in vCenter 6.5

The vCenter Server has an internal user database that allows you to add and manage users with the vSphere Web Client. Users management and Single Sign-On is provided by the Platform Service Controller which is available since vSphere 6.0. In a large environment, you might want to connect your virtualization infrastructure to a centrally manage Active Directory.

This article explains how to add AD authentication in vSphere 6.5 and how to get the "Use Windows session authentication" checkbox to work with the enhanced authentication plugin. This works for both, the vCenter Server 6.5 installed on a Windows Server and the vCenter Server Appliance (vCSA).

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How to Join the vCSA 6.5 to an Active Directory Domain

In vSphere 6.5 the underlying operating system from the vCenter Server Appliance (vCSA) has been changed to VMwares PhotonOS. With the new OS, you can still join an Active Directory domain to comply with company policies, or if you want to use windows session authentication. Joining an Active Directory domain is included in the infrastructure node configuration which is part of the Platform Services Controller. Please verify standard AD requirements like time synchronization and naming prior to joining a domain.

If you want to log in with the "Windows session authentication" checkbox, you have to add the appliance running the Platform Services Controller (PSC) to the domain. For embedded deployments, join the appliance running both, the vCenter and the PSC to the domain.

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The Physical block size reported by the device is not supported

Since my ESXi hosts are upgraded to VMware vSphere ESXi 6.5, the vmkernel.log is constantly spammed with warnings reporting that the physical block size from my LUNs, provided by a FreeNAS storage, have an unsupported block size.

WARNING: ScsiPath: 4394: The Physical block size "131072" reported by the path vmhba64:C0:T4:L0 is not supported. The only supported physical blocksizes are 512 and 4096
WARNING: ScsiDeviceIO: 6462: The Physical block size "131072" reported by the device naa.6589cfc0000000572b71f35019e9c31f is not supported. The only supported physical blocksizes are 512 and 4096

I'm using FreeNAS-9.10.2 with iSCSI LUNs backed by a ZFS volume. The physical blocksize is reported as the ZFS recordsize which is 128K by default. Read more »