JSON Repository Format Update and now with SCSI Codes

Whenever I create databases with information like ESXi Versions, vCenter Versions or VMware's HCL I try make these available to be used for automation or in scripts. JSON is my data-type of choice but I figured that another structure might be easier to handle in some circumstances. This is why I've now created separate versions where it is now possible to access the information with keys.

Here is an example of the ESXi Releases JSON File, and the new V2:

Read more »

SCSI Sense Code Decoder OP Code Update

I've added a new feature to my online SCSI Sense Code Decoder. It is now possible to enter the Command that has been reported to be failed into the form. The command is displayed in the error message and can be important for troubleshooting:

The Command can be optionally entered in the form and will be translated:

Another small fix: Previously, Host Status and Sense Key fields were case sensitive and have to be entered in lower case. This requirement has been removed, you can now use lower or upper case letters.

The next feature I'm working on is to make the decoder to work with scripts to allow even better and faster troubleshooting. Any other feature requests are welcome.

VMware ESXi SCSI Sense Code Decoder

Using the first 3D Xpoint based Intel Optane SSD with ESXi

I could get my hands on Intel's first 3D XPoint based SSD to figure out how it performs.

3D XPoint is a new non-volatile memory technology that has been developed by Intel and Micron.

With 32GB, it doesn't make sense to buy them for anything else than their intended use case: Cache device to enhance SSD/HDD Performance. If you want to use Optane technology as VM Datastore, wait a couple of months when devices with a higher capacity are available.

 

Read more »

VCSA 6.5 Broken Filesystem - "Welcome to Emergency Mode"

Today I managed to crash the storage used in my home lab. After fixing the FreeNAS box, my vCenter Server Appliance (Version 6.5 Update 1) refused to boot and after opening the console, it welcomed me with the following error message:

Welcome to emergency mode! After logging in, type "journalctl -xb" to view system logs, "systemctl reboot" to reboot, "systemctl default" or ^D to try again to boot into default mode.
Give root password for maintenance
(or press Control-D to continue):

Typically, this problem is caused by filesystem issues. This article explains how to fix the filesystem and get the appliance back up.

Read more »

What's inside VMware vSphere 6.5 Update 1

VMware has just released vSphere 6.5 Update 1 including the following producs:

If you want to get notified about new products, subscribe to my vTracker RSS Feed.

Read more »

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide Part 6 - Troubleshooting

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide

The "vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide" series explains how to manage your VMware Virtual SAN environment with the Ruby vSphere Console. RVC is an interactive command line tool to control and automate your platform. If you are new to RVC, make sure to read the Getting Started with Ruby vSphere Console Guide. All commands are from the latest vSAN 6.6 version.

The sixth part is about troubleshooting vSAN deployments.

Read more »

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide Part 5 - Performance Service

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide

The "vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide" series explains how to manage your VMware Virtual SAN environment with the Ruby vSphere Console. RVC is an interactive command line tool to control and automate your platform. If you are new to RVC, make sure to read the Getting Started with Ruby vSphere Console Guide. All commands are from the latest vSAN 6.6 version.

In the fifth part, I'm working with commands related to the vSAN performance service. These commands are used to enable and configure the vSAN Performance Service and gather performance related information.

Read more »

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide Part 4 - Cluster Health

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide

The "vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide" series explains how to manage your VMware Virtual SAN environment with the Ruby vSphere Console. RVC is an interactive command line tool to control and automate your platform. If you are new to RVC, make sure to read the Getting Started with Ruby vSphere Console Guide. All commands are from the latest vSAN 6.6 version.

In the fourth part, I'm working with commands related to the vSAN health plugin. These commands are only available when the Health Services are installed.

Read more »

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide Part 3 - Object Management

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide

The "vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide" series explains how to manage your VMware Virtual SAN environment with the Ruby vSphere Console. RVC is an interactive command line tool to control and automate your platform. If you are new to RVC, make sure to read the Getting Started with Ruby vSphere Console Guide. All commands are from the latest vSAN 6.6 version.

The third part explains commands related to the object management in vSAN. These commands are used for troubleshooting or reconfiguration of objects. They also provide an insight on how vSAN works.

Read more »

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide Part 2 - Cluster-Administration

vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide

The "vSAN 6.6 RVC Guide" series explains how to manage your VMware Virtual SAN environment with the Ruby vSphere Console. RVC is an interactive command line tool to control and automate your platform. If you are new to RVC, make sure to read the Getting Started with Ruby vSphere Console Guide. All commands are from the latest vSAN 6.6 version.

The second part explains commands related to vSAN cluster administration tasks. These commands are required to gather information about ESXi hosts and the cluster itself. They also provide important information when you want to maintain your vSAN cluster or configure a stretched cluster:

Read more »